For HTTP monitors, Uptime Robot considers them as up or down according to the HTTP statuses returned (or if “no response returns at all”).

If the HTTP status returned is:

  • between 200 and 399, it is considered as “up”
  • bigger than 399, is considered as “down”
  • with an exception:
    • equals 401 and no authentication info is defined, it is considered as up
    • equals 401 and authentication info is defined, it is considered as down

Custom HTTP Statuses

It is now possible to customize which HTTP statuses are considered as up or down.

This is pretty handy if you plan to monitor a web page which returns HTTP 404 and want it to be detected as “up”, prefer to ignore several erroneous HTTP statuses and more.

The feature is available in the Pro Plan and can be reached from the “Add/Edit Monitor dialogs of HTTP monitors>Advanced Settings>Custom HTTP Statuses tab”.

Uptime Robot, by default, sends all HTTP requests with pre-defined HTTP headers.

Now, it is possible to customize this totally with the “Custom HTTP Headers” feature that can be found in the Pro Plan’s “Add/Edit Monitor Dialog>Advanced>Custom Headers” option.

Custom HTTP Headers

Sample use cases:

  • For monitoring the mobile version of a web page, we can use a mobile “User-Agent” header to force the site to serve the mobile content.
  • The site may be requiring/expecting various authorization HTTP Headers
  • We may want to white-label the requests and change the User-Agent to a custom one

Hope it helps for a better monitoring :).

Getting notifications of downtime/uptime via Slack or HipChat is widely used.

Yet, until now, it was only possible to “target” rooms and not users.

There is now a “custom text” feature in the “Add/Edit Alert Contact” dialogs for HipChat and Slack where the text mentioned there will be sent with each notification.

As an example, we can now use custom text like:

  • @everyone for Slack to notify everyone
  • @SlackUserID for Slack to notify a specific user
  • @here in HipChat to notify all users in the room
  • @all in HipChat to notify everyone in the room
  • @HipChatUsername to notify a specific user

Hope this helps for a better experience :).

 

https-smallPublic Status Pages, a feature to easily share the statuses of the monitors with others, was introduced few months ago.

The standard status page URLs (like https://stats.uptimerobot.com/xyz) were HTTPs-enabled since day one.

However, the ones behind a custom domain (like http://status.mywebsite.com) were not as it was a little more tricky to get a SSL certificate for all the custom domains.

Good news, custom domains are now HTTPs enabled too (thanks to the free + automated CA: Let’s Encrypt).

And, all status pages are actually HTTPs-only from now on.

Important note for CloudFlare users:

As the status pages are now HTTPs-only, the “flexible SSL feature of CloudFlare” will end up in an infinite redirect. There are 2 options to make it work:

  • disabling the “cloud feature” for the CNAME
  • or, using Full or Strict SSL feature

Uptime Robot’s API is consumed pretty much (with over 5,000,000+ requests/day) for “automating monitor management”, pulling the data to generate custom reports and more.

As the usage grows every day, the APIv2 is built for a faster, more secure and stable experience with added features.

SSL and POST only

The APIv2 expects all parameters to be sent as a POST request and works SSL-only where both changes together help making it more secure.

Updated parameter names and speed

The parameter names and responses are very consistent now. They are all lower-case, separated with “_” (like api_key).

And, most methods are now ~ 2x to 5x faster.

Added features

It is now possible to pull more data with getMonitors method, including:

  • getting the uptime % of a range (or multiple ranges) with custom_uptime_ranges parameter
  • getting the all time duration of statuses with  all_time_uptime_durations parameter
  • getting the logs of a given period with logs_start_date and logs_end_date parameters
  • getting maintenance windows of a monitor

And, maintenance windows can also now be managed with the API too.

Code samples

The updated documentation page now has code samples for each monitor in multiple scripting and programming languages including PHP, Python, Nodejs, Go, Ruby, C# and Java.

When will APIv1 be retired?

APIv2 is the version that will be improved from now on and APIv1 is planned to be retired by 1 June 2017. So, please make sure that you switch to the new API before then.

Suggestions and bug reports

We are already using APIv2 in production, so, it is pretty stable. Yet, there is always a change of bugs and please let us know if you experience one.

Also, look forward to any suggestions and feature requests to make it better.

Uptime Robot helps getting notified of any downtime so that any possible issues can be resolved quickly.

It is also very good idea to share the statuses of the monitors with website visitors or teammates so that they know how the website/system performs too.

Such a communication helps them to know “it is or it is not only them when they experience issues reaching the sites/servers”.

Public Status Pages

This new feature helps creating such a public status page in seconds where the page will be displaying all the major details needed (uptime status and ratio for the last 7 days, response time and down events).

Note: As a demo, check Uptime Robot’s status page.

Status Page

Here are the steps to create it:

  • go to My Settings>Public Status Pages
  • choose all or preferred monitors to be displayed in the status page
  • customize it by uploading your logo (optional)
  • get the unique link and share with others
  • that is all!

Status Page Details

The status page can be consumed with the unique link generated or under a custom domain by setting up a DNS>CNAME record that points to stats.uptimerobot.com.

Also, you can choose to password-protect the status page as well.

P.S> More customization features are on the way :).

Starting on 2016-09-14, we are adding a new IP block to the system.

The current IP blocks are still staying active and we’ll start to send requests from this new IP block too.

Here are the details:

IP Block: 63.143.42.240/28

which means that the IPs are:

  • 63.143.42.242
  • 63.143.42.243
  • 63.143.42.244
  • 63.143.42.245
  • 63.143.42.246
  • 63.143.42.247
  • 63.143.42.248
  • 63.143.42.249
  • 63.143.42.250
  • 63.143.42.251
  • 63.143.42.252

And, the up-to-date list of the IPs can always be found in different formats at: https://uptimerobot.com/locations.

Great news! Uptime Robot now has an official mobile app.

The app allows performing the most critical actions (add/edit/delete monitors, view stats) and it supports push notifications.

Uptime Robot App

The app will be improved regularly and missing features/actions will be added in the next weeks (like “creating alert contacts”).

How does push notifications work?

Once logged in to the app, it simply:

  • asks for a “friendly name” for the mobile device
  • and creates a “mobile alert contact” with that name.

And, the rest works just the same as other alert contacts so that you can get alerted via push notifications only for the monitors you prefer.

Get the app

The app can be downloaded from:

Hope that you like it and it helps for a better uptime.

You’ll remember that SSL 3.0 is no longer secure since October 2014 with the discovery of Poodle attack. And, it is also disabled by default on all popular browsers.

On the other hand, there are still a small number of websites that support SSL 3.0 (which must definitely be disabled).

Starting tomorrow (6 April 2016), we’ll also be dropping support on sending SSL 3.0 compatible requests which will make the monitoring “not function” for those websites (a website’s SSL 3.0 support can be checked from SSL Labs).

Once Uptime Robot detects that a website requires SSL 3.0 for HTTPs communication, it’ll not mark the monitor as down but pause it and notify the user via e-mail with the information for taking action.

 P.S> Disable SSLv3 is a nice website that shares “web server specific information” regarding “how to disable SSL 3.0″

We all want our websites/servers to be “up” all the time and take multiple actions to increase uptime.

Yet, not all sites/servers are built for 100% uptime. Some have various tasks that cause downtime like:

  • backups
  • batch jobs
  • restarts
  • upgrades
  • etc.

Uptime Robot now has a new feature (for the Pro Plan) to handle such one-time or regular downtimes nicely:

Maintenance Windows

The feature is for easily defining once or recurring “do-not-monitor periods”.

As an example, we can now set a Maintenance Window that will start “Every Tuesday at 22:35 and run for 20 minutes”. Uptime Robot will stop the monitoring as 22:35 and resume it 20 minutes later so that you don’t get any “expected notifications”.

Maintennace Windows

It has support for:

  • once
  • daily
  • weekly
  • monthly

schedules. And, the way it works is very familiar (just like Alert Contacts).

They can simply be defined from the “My Settings” page and attached to the monitors of choice from the Add/Edit Monitor dialogs.

Simple and functional :).